Computer Nightmares

I’m writing this on my “trusty” 15″ MacBook Pro. It’s the first thing I’m writing on it since a major repair: a new logic board. All together, my MBP has been down for over a month, and it’s my primary machine for, well, everything. See, my wife and I both have 2011 MacBook Pros, and they are identical in every way, including how they both failed. If you google a bit, you’ll find that these computers have a manufacturing defect, their AGP video “card” (really, a chip), is soldered to the logic board with lead-free solder, which degrades, cracks, grows feathery crystals that short between contacts, in all, over time most of them fail catastrophically rendering the logic board pretty much artwork.

There’s a class-action lawsuit filed against Apple about this, as repairs run between $500 and $1200, on a piece of computer hardware that cost nearly $2000 new. Yes, I’ve joined the suit. But I also fixed my own computers.

Since my wife’s MacBook failed first, I pulled her logic board out and sent it away to be rebuilt/exchanged. During the time it was away, I put her hard drive into my MacBook and she continued her work as if nothing was wrong. I, unfortunately, did not. My back-up laptop is a Windows XP machine. Yes, I still have some hair left on my head.

Just about the time her logic board came back and I got your MacBook up and running, and mine running again, mine failed too. I had it for about 3 days, then off it’s logic board went for the same repairs, and I just got it back and working. It’s been a long month!

During that time I discovered a few things worth sharing, even with those reading this with a primary interest in Home Theater. You don’t really know how much or little you have backed-up until you loose your computer completely. In my case, I ran backups using an external drive and Apple’s Time Machine. So even if my computer never ran again, I could do a complete restore to a new unit. Great, but what do I do if I don’t want a complete restore, don’t have a new computer, and just need some files? Well, that backup is useless. I pulled my main HDD out of the MacBook Pro, and mounted it up in an external drive bay, and mounted it on my Mac Pro so I could access some files, but that didn’t get me my full email because my MacPro is older, doesn’t run the current OS version, and my mail files wouldn’t import.

For email, I used my iPad, which I love/hate for many reasons. First, it’s my development platform for our Platinum Control system, so it can’t just wander off with me. Second, typing on the screen….ugh. Never do well with it, even with autocorrect. My USB keyboard is also tiny, and disables autocorrect, so other than good for quick not-taking, it’s really limited.

Then there’s applications. Never realized exactly how many I use that don’t exist on our other machines! Makes for some interesting license swapping, to say the least.

Then there’s my iTunes library. It’s about 140gig, not exactly “portable”, and while the MacBook Pro was down, it was anchored to the Mac Pro, which IS an anchor. Sorry, cloud backup for 140Gig just ain’t in my world.

My backup strategy is still developing now. I’ll still do the usual routine TimeMachine backups, but I’m also keeping a copy of other critical files, license keys, emails, etc, on another drive (formatted NTSF, by the way), and that will hopefully make access easier next time. I’m also working on automatically doing that because I’ll never remember on my own. And, finally, I’m installing critical apps and tools on more than just my laptop so I can deal with things on other hardware, and hopefully, not have to EVER use webmail again!

Next move is an upgrade. I’m doing an SSD and shared HDD in the optical drive bay, and attempting triple-boot, OSX (latest version) Win 7, and OSX 10.7.5, so I can still use older software every so often. You can’t triple boot with Bootcamp alone, so this should be interesting!

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